[UPDATE 8:04 P.M. 9/23/20]: Officials in Hiawatha also say in an announcement that "sufficient headway has been made on the reduction of storm debris within the City of Hiawatha that the restriction on recreational fires within the City of Hiawatha can be lifted, effective 9/23/20.". Recreational fires are described by Hiawatha officials as "an outdoor fire using charcoal, propane, or untreated wood in an outdoor fire pit, outdoor fireplace, portable outdoor fireplace, or grill and with a fuel area less than 3 feet in diameter and 2 feet in height, for purposes of cooking, warmth, pleasure, or similar purpose".]

[ORIGINAL STORY:]

Cedar Rapids still has its recreational burn ban in effect until further notice, but another Linn County town is relaxing its rules as it continues to recover from the August 10 derecho.

KCRG says Marion has eased some of its restrictions within city limits. Residents there are now allowed to burn firewood in portable fire pits "with a lid or a screened top" or using gas appliances such as fire tables.

They can still NOT do any open burning using in-ground firepits or use storm debris as firewood.

Marion Fire Chief Deb Krebill spoke about the restrictions, saying "we are close to having the first pass of tree debris collected. This reduces a lot of the risk associated with the use of covered, portable fire pits. Krebill encourages residents to be "mindful of their surroundings and practice fire safety when enjoying recreational fires". Mayor Nicholas AbouAssaby says that after the initial burn ban proclamation banning ALL burning as of August 13, cleanup has progressed well enough to relax some of the rules.

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The City of Cedar Rapids, according to their storm response page, plans to keep their burn ban in effect indefinitely, until at least the second pass across the city collecting tree debris from the storm..

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